Saturday, March 28, 2015 Local time: 18:47



About Gandhara

Gandhara, an ancient region comprising parts of today's Afghanistan and Pakistan, inspires this page, which provides foreign policy audiences with reporting, analysis and commentary direct from our local correspondents in Afghanistan and Pakistan with the aim of promoting peace in the region. 
 

Interview

Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani (L) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a news conference after a day of talks at Camp David on  March 23.

Afghan President Ghani Thanks U.S. At Pentagon

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has begun a U.S. visit by thanking the United States for its support during 14 years of war. More


Multimedia

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Afghan President Says Islamic State A Threat To Central Asiai
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25.03.2015
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has told a joint session of the U.S. Congress that Islamic State militants, also known as Da'esh, are a threat to Central Asia. He also said that peace with the Taliban was possible. (Reuters)
Video

Video Afghan President Says Islamic State A Threat To Central Asia

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has told a joint session of the U.S. Congress that Islamic State militants, also known as Da'esh, are a threat to Central Asia. He also said that peace with the Taliban was possible. (Reuters)
Video

Video Suicide Bombing Strikes Government District In Kabul

A suicide bomber detonated an explosives-packed vehicle on March 25 in a neighborhood of Kabul near several ministry buildings. Officials said at least seven people were killed and 22 wounded. (RFE/RL's Radio Free Afghanistan)
Video

Video Thousands Protest In Kabul In Wake Of Mob Killing

Thousands of people marched in Kabul for a second straight day to demand that the killers of a 27-year-old woman be brought to justice. Men and women carried pictures of the bloodied face of Farkhunda, the victim of the March 19 mob attack, and chanted "Justice for Farkhunda!"
Video

Video Afghan Protesters Demand Justice For Woman Killed By Mob

Hundreds of people rallied in Kabul on March 23 to demand justice for a woman killed by a mob that accused her of burning the Koran. The victim, identified as Farkhunda, a religious school student, was beaten to death by a crowd outside a Kabul mosque on March 19.
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Video Female Afghan Activists Carry Coffin Of Woman Killed By Mob

An Afghan woman who was killed by a mob for allegedly burning a copy of the Koran was buried in Kabul on March 22. Women's rights activists carried the coffin of the woman, named Farkhunda, amid crowds of people demanding that the killers be brought to justice. (Reuters)

Culture

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  • Buddha - with the Halo of Enlightenment. It was painted in 1952.
  • A self-portrait of Ghani Khan in traditional attire.
  • His wife Roshan Ghani Khan, visualized as a radiant crescent against a background of dark clouds -- Pastel on Paper.
  • Untitled portrait of a woman. Presented to Imtiaz Ahmad Sahibzada as a wedding gift in 1970. Poster paint on paper.
  • Zareen, Khan's younger daughter.
  • Self-portrait, depicting a tortured soul with a crown of thorns around his head.
  • A untitled portrait presented to an admirer Inayat Ilahi Malik.
  • A portrait of Shandana, Ghani Khan's elder daughter. Pastel on paper.
  • An untitled portrait, presented to a friend Qazi Inyatullah as a wedding gift in July 1966.
  • Untitled portrait.
  • A portrait of Sahibzada Farooq, a close friend of Khan’s.
  • Untitled painting of a woman.
  • Portrait of Hasham Baber, a poet and friend of Ghani Khan’s. Charcoal on paper.
  • Visualization of Ali Khan, a well-known 19th-century Pashtun poet.
  • Portrait of a friend Himayatullah Khan, depicting his teen years.
  • Abdul Ghani Khan in the winter of 1979.

The Masterstrokes Of Ghani Khan

Abdul Ghani Khan (1914-1996), a master poet, sculptor and painter, was inspired by the Impressionists but developed his own style. He mostly concentrated on painting the human face because "of the infinite possibilities for the portrayal of feelings and emotions." He liked pastels but also used charcoal, pencil and paint brush. Imtiaz Ahmad Sahibzada, a friend and admirer, provided these photographs of Khan's paintings.

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Informed Comment

  • 'Je Suis Charlie' Is Not Good Enough

    ​At RFE/RL's most recent weekly editorial meeting, as we discussed coverage of the Paris terrorist attacks, a colleague said: "We all feel guilty! I know many of us who are ashamed or afraid to leave their homes. We need to do a story about this as well." More

Debating Room

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) wave to students outside the Great Hall of the People, in Beijing, October 2014.

RFE/RLive: Can China Help Rebuild Afghanistan?

In the most recent episode of RFE/RLive, leading Western scholars weigh in on China's expanding role in stabilizing neighboring Afghanistan and Pakistan. More

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News

Press Room

March 21, 2015

Villager Named Radio Free Afghanistan's "Person Of The Year"

RFE/RL's Radio Free Afghanistan has named Jawas Khan, a farmer residing in a remote village in the country's Khost province, the recipient of its eighth annual Person of the Year award.
More